04 November 2017

Tombstone Tuesday: Siblings Franklin and Lillian Schwartz, Montefiore Cemetery, Queens, New York

During the last two weeks I enjoyed time in the New York metropolitan area. While on Long Island I visited and recorded graves at several Jewish cemeteries in which relatives of mine are interred. Since I had not recently been to the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association plots (which I have been documenting for several years on this blog), I stopped by to record a few recent burials. 

For some reason I'd not quite recorded all the infant graves in the plots in Montefiore Cemetery. In doing so this time, I noted two children of Joseph and Gussie Kargman Schwartz: Franklin and Lillian.


Here lies
Efraim son of
Shmuel Yakov
FRANKLIN
SCHWARTZ
DIED
MAR. 25, 1929
AGE 8 1/2 MOS.
 
Franklin's short life (8.5 months) missed enumeration in census records. He was born about August-September 1928 and passed away on 2 March 1929 of laryngeal diphtheria.[1]

Leah bat Shmuel Yakov
LILLIAN
SCHWARTZ
DIED OCT. 20, 1931
AGE 20 MONTHS 

Franklin Schwartz was gone by the time Lillian was born in about February 1930. She was recorded as just 2 months old in the April census.[2] Lillian Schwartz died on 20 October 1931 of pertussis (whooping cough).[3] She had been admitted to the Willard Parker Hospital (a communicable diseases hospital) in Manhattan on 12 October 1931 and died more than a week later.

In both cases, the children's father was identified on their gravestones as Shmuel Yakov. Their father Joe was identified as Schmariya Yakov on his gravestone.

After finding these two children, I did a bit more research on Joseph and Gussie children who lived to adulthood. 

Their eldest daughter, Shirley, born 29 December 1925, married William Rackowitz. 

The family had moved to Hartford, Connecticut sometime between 1935 and March 1940 (they were recorded in Hartford in the April 1940 census). Both children stayed in that area. 

Shirley died on 12 July 2010 and her grave may be found in the Hartford Mutual Society Memorial Park. Her Find A Grave entry includes a transcription of her obituary from the Hartford Courant. On her grave, her father's Hebrew name is listed as Yosef.

Younger brother Milton Schwartz, born 22 June 1933, married Nancy Singer Schwartz, and passed away on 28 April 2010. According to his obituary, he working with his glazer father at State Glass in Hartford. Later, he managed an electrical wholesale business in Hartford.[4] His grave is located in Beth El Temple Cemetery, Avon, Connecticut.

The children who died, Lillian and Franklin, are interred in one of the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association plots in Montefiore Cemetery, block 89, gate 156N. Lillian is in line 1L, grave 8 and Franklin is in line 1R, grave 10.

Notes:
1. New York County, New York, death certificate no. 9192 (1929), Franklin Schwartz, 25 March 1929;
microfilm image, FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org : accessed 07 November 2017), microfilm 2,057,015 ; citing Municipal Archives, New York City.
2. 1930 U.S. Census, New York County, population schedule, Manhattan, e.d. 31-217, sheet 14B, dwelling 39, family 400, Joseph and Gussie Schwartz; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 15 January 2011); citing NARA microfilm publication T626, roll 1555.
3. New York County, New York, death certificate no. 24555 (1931), Lillian Schwartz, 20 October 1931; microfilm image, FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org : accessed 8 January 2016), microfilm 2,069,352; citing Municipal Archives, New York City. 
4. Milton Schwartz, obituary, Hartford Courant (Hartford, CT), 30 April - 1 May 2010; transcription, Legacy (http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/hartfordcourant/obituary.aspx?n=milton-schwartz&pid=142356408 : accessed 4 November 2017).

23 October 2017

Comment Submitted to NYC Dept of Health and Mental Hygeine!


Don't let the opportunity to comment pass you by!

About a month ago I posted my draft. Here's what I just sent to NYC DOH.

I urge New York City to make birth and death records public and transfer them, on a fixed schedule, from The Department of Health and Mental Hygiene to DORIS (i.e., the Municipal Archives). I also urge New York City to not adopt further restrictions on when vital records will become publicly available. With regard to potential identity theft, this proposed rule is applying a sledge hammer to facilitate installation of a thumb tack.

For death records, I urge you to adopt a 10-year rule without restriction or, even better, adopt an open records option (similar to some other states). The federal Privacy Act does not apply to dead people. Probate law requires public access to probate records so that potential heirs may be fully informed. As a result, for many people, their death information is known. The vast majority of stolen identities are from living people made vulnerable via their use of social media, use of credit cards or response to email spam. Identity theft using names of the dead is an extraordinarily small percentage of identity theft cases. I believe open records, rather than restricted ones, are more likely to be helpful with regard to the dead. For example, if companies had accessible death databases and records, they would be less likely to accept credit applications using names of dead people.

While the example provided in the NYC proposed rule of protecting a living mother’s dead child’s record (remember we are talking here about a mother who would likely be several years past 90 years old), may tug at the heart strings, I urge you to also think about equally compelling and much more common situations. There are many more people who die without issue. Under current NYC restrictions imposed by the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, no relatives but parents, grandparents, direct descendants or siblings may acquire death records even if those records are more than 50 years old. It is impossible for anyone, including caring relatives, to acquire the records necessary to allow adequate remembrance of their dearly loved aunts, uncles and cousins. This is not only ridiculous, but also unconscionable. Certainly, there are many more death records for people in this category than for the child and mother in the first hypothetical instance.

The hypothetical situation presented, highlights an important issue regarding background research for any proposed restrictions of records access in New York City. While there are few states that are currently more restrictive than New York City regarding vital records, there are some states that are less restrictive. Research on their successes and failures in this regard is relevant. Ohio and North Carolina provide non-certified copies of birth and death records to all. New York City is currently one of the most restrictive states. Yet, all three states are about equal, statistically in identity theft. In “Facts + Statistics: Identity Theft and Cybercrime,” a 2017 article online at the Insurance Information Institute (https://www.iii.org/fact-statistic/facts-statistics-identity-theft-and-cybercrime ), they note that New York ranks 22nd (102.3 complaints/100,000 people), North Carolina 26th (96.1/100,000) and Ohio 27th (94.8/100,000) among states.  Clearly, open records are not correlated with increased identity theft.

With regard to the proposal to increase birth record restrictions, it is important to note that nearly all of the PII on birth records is readily available for everyone to find via the Internet. Birth records, themselves, are not the reason this information is available online. This information is available because it has been required by many government and private organizations for credit and land transactions and is available publicly. Or, the information may have been stolen during any one of many recent company and government agency data breaches. The PII DOH is proposing to protect via vital record access restrictions is already publicly available. Restricting birth records beyond 100 years in New York City will not change this situation in any way.

It is also important to note that, by the statistics provided in the proposed rule regarding birth records, those over 100 years old make up but 0.4 % of the New York City population. This same NYC-led sledge hammer-like approach to a miniscule issue is stunning. It, like the proposal for death records, belies a callous disregard for public access and government accountability.

Many jurisdictions throughout the United States have open records laws, much more liberal that New York City. New York City has been more restrictive than New York State for some time with little or no explanation to the public for this difference and with no discernable advantage for PII protection. Unlike New York City, New York State and many other jurisdictions do not seem to view further restriction on public access in the public interest.

I would hope that actions with regard to further public record restrictions would be weighed seriously and considered with regard to whether the solutions proposed will have any impact on the problems identified. I suggest the solutions are draconian and unwarranted and, most importantly, will have no effect on the identified issue of privacy.

In closing, I would like to suggest an option that seems not to have been considered: making non-certified copies of birth and death records accessible to all with few years of restriction (perhaps 75 for birth and 10 for death), but making certified copies accessible only to direct descendants and those with tangible interest. Since most of the information on birth and death records are already available via the Internet, this would ensure that legally certified birth records would be used and reserved for the most important purposes.

Emily Garber
23 October 2017

17 October 2017

Tombstone Tuesday: David Perlman and Lillian Reitman Perlman, Montefiore Cemetery, Queens, New York

Sometimes it all falls into place!

Over the last several years I have been documenting people who were interred in Labun/Lubin community landsmanshaft (First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association) plots in Old Montefiore and Beth Moses Cemeteries in New York. 

I have to admit to doing the easier pickins' first: the ones who died earlier than 1949 and/or married before 1938 for whom I could access death and marriage records in New York City. I also went after those old enough to have been married and enumerated as a family in the 1940 U.S. census. Being able to unambiguous identify one's quarry is critical.

Here lies
Our beloved mother
Mrs. Leah daughter of Moshe
Died 2 Nisan 5747
BELOVED WIFE
DEAR MOTHER
GRANDMOTHER
GREAT-GRANDMOTHER
LILLIAN
PERLMAN
DIED MARCH 31, 1987
AGE 87 YEARS
FOREVER IN OUR HEARTS

I had avoided the Perlman's because I could not immediately tell which one of them, if either, were associated with the community. It seemed a challenge to find records linking them to each other. 

Here lies
Our beloved husband and father
Mr. David son of Shmuel
Died 2 Cheshvan 5714
May his soul be bound in the bonds of the living
BELOVED HUSBAND
AND DEAR FATHER
DAVID
PERLMAN
DIED OCT. 11, 1953
AGE 53 YEARS 

My first break in the mystery was finding an indexed New York City marriage license record. I searched on the name David Perlman (not exact for either name) and found that Dave Perlman and Lilly Reitman had applied for a license on 13 February 1924.[1] An aha! moment. The name Reitman was fairly significant in the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association (see previous posts here, here, here and here). 

Lillian Perlman's patronymic on her gravestone inscription led me to her parents who I'd already documented. That led me to the Italian Genealogy Group's New York City Marriage Index where I located the Dave and Lilly's indexed marriage certificate. I located their marriage certificate via the FamilySearch catalogue on digitized microfilm and confirmed that Lilly was indeed the daughter of Morris and Dora Reitman.[2]

She arrived in New York City as Leja Chajtman. She'd landed with her mother and siblings on the S.S. Kroonland on 9 August 1921.[3] 

David Perlman was born about 10 May 1900 to Samuel (Shmuel) and Bessie [original name currently unknown] Bienstein.[4] His original surname was likely Perlich. His passenger manifest when he arrived by himself in New York on 18 January 1921, indicated that he had last resided in "Sudydkon." This is likely to have been Sudylkiv (today in Ukraine) - a community 24 kilometers northwest of Labun.[5] David's place of birth was listed as "Antydkon." Taking the mistakes in Sudylkiv as a guide, one might think that his place of birth was something like "Antylkiv." But, I have not yet determined what community this may have been (I have a sneaking suspicion that the town was still Sudylikiv but was mangled in transcription).

David held a variety of jobs in New York. In 1925, he worked making shoes and lived with Lillian and their daughter Pauline at 359 Berriman Street, Brooklyn.[6]

By 1930, the family was at 415 Central Avenue, Brooklyn and Dave worked as a glazier in a glass store (perhaps his father-in-law's). The Perlmans now included son Bernard.[7]

The 1940 U.S. census showed David without an occupation. His father-in-law Morris Reitman had died in 1935 and, in the midst of the Great Depression, things were difficult for small business owners. He may have been unemployed. There was no indication on the census of how the family was supporting themselves. They lived at 313 East 4th Street, New York, New York and had a third child, daughter Barbara.[8]

Lilly naturalized on 14 February 1933. She reported her birth date as 20 August 1900 in "Volin, Russia." Her children had been born in Brooklyn:
  • Pauline, 11 July 1924 
  • Bernard, 23 May 1927 [9]
Barbara was born about 1933-34, after her mother Lilly provided information for her petition for naturalization.

Pauline married Harry Krug.[10] That determination led to a wonderful discovery - a 2014 article in Tablet by Morris Dickstein. Morris, son of Anna Reitman Dickstein (sister of Lilly) [Harry and Pauline were not buried in the Labun plots, but Anna and her husband Abe Dickstein are. I'd previously no idea who they were (!)] has written a loving memory of his cousin-in-law, Harry Krug. He provided some great genealogical information - solving some mysteries for me - but, even better, provided the kinds of information not readily determined via records, alone.

With regard to his mother's extended family:
...This matriarchy was dominated by strong-minded women like Harry's mother-in-law, my aunt Lily, stubborn and spiky as a Russian peasant, and Harry's wife Pauline, a force of nature, who had crisp reactions to everyone she knew...
He described  the mild-mannered men who'd married into this family having to "surrender their passports and go native."

Pauline and Harry met in the neighborhood when they were 12 and were high school sweethearts. They married after Harry's service in World War II. 

I recommend the article - a well-written memoir.

Pauline passed away in October 1995. Her brother Bernard married Trude Schwartz in 1953 and died on 9 September 1997.[11] Bernard and his wife are not interred in the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association plots either.

David's and Lillian's graves are located in Montefiore Cemetery, Queens, NY, block 89, gate 156N. David is in line 9R, grave 3 and Lillian line 11L, grave 4.

Notes:
1. Some records show Lillian's name Lillie, some as Lilly, sometimes as Lillian. Perlman is sometimes written as Pearlman. "New York City, Marriage License Indexes, 1907-1995," index, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 13 October 2017), entry for Dave Perlman and Lilly Reitman, 13 February 1924, license no. 4065, Manhattan; citing Municipal Archives, New York City.
2. For some reason, Dave and Lilly's marriage certificate has not been indexed on FamilySearch. Nevertheless, an image of the certificate is, indeed, among FamilySearch holdings. Kings County, New York, marriage certificate no. 2581 (1924), Dave Perlman and Lilly Reitman; images, "New York, Brooklyn, marriage certificates, 1866-1937," FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org : accessed 17 October 2017), New York, Brooklyn, marriage certificates, 1866-1937>Cert. no. 2251-3500 Feb-Mar 1924 (FHL film 1,614,488). 
3. Manifest, S.S. Kroonland, 9 August 1921, p. 15, line 9, Leja Chajtman, age 20; images, "New York, Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 18 December 2010). 
4. David's parents' names come from his marriage certificate. Kings County, New York, marriage certificate 2581 (1923), David Perlman and Lilly Reitman, 17 February 1923. 
His date of birth is from his naturalization record. David Perlman, naturalization file no. 75576 (9 August 1927), U.S. District Court, Eastern District of New York; images, Fold3 (http://www.fold3.com : accessed 16 October 2017).
His original surname might have been Perlich (as shown his naturalization), but on his passenger manifest, it shows Perlier. Manifest, S.S.Gothland, 18 January 1921, p. 8, line 18, Dawid Perlier, age 22; images, "New York, Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 16 October 2017).
5. David's brother (mentioned on his manifest), Samuel Perlman, arrived in the USA in 1912 and reported birth in Sudylkiv. Manifest, S.S. Konigin Luise, 6 December 1912, p. 22, line 11, Joine Perlitz, age 20; images, "New York, Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 17 October 2017). See also "U.S., World War II Draft Registration Card, 1942," images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 17 October 2017), entry for Sam Perlman, serial no. U842, Newark, Essex County, New Jersey.
6. 1925 New York State Census, Kings County, enumeration of inhabitants, Brooklyn, assembly district 22, election district 43, p. 92, no. 44-46, David and Lillian Pearlman family; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 15 October 2017); citing New York State Archives, Albany.
7. 1930 U.S. Census, Kings Co., NY, population schedule, Brooklyn, enumeration district 24-420, sheet 21B, dwelling 203, family 527, David and Lillie Pearlman family; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 15 October 2017); citing NARA microfilm publication T626, roll 1535.
8. 1940 U.S. Census, New York Co., NY, pop. sched., Manhattan, e.d. 31-500, sheet 6A, household 98, David and Lillian Perlman family; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 15 October 2017); citing NARA microfilm publication T627, roll 2635.
9. Lilly Perlman, naturalization file no. 167426 (1933), U.S. District Court, Eastern District of New York; images, New York, State and Federal Naturalization Records, 1794-1940," Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 15 October 2017).
10. A search on Pauline Perlman in Ancestry's "U.S., Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007," database led to her married surname.
"U.S., Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007," index, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 15 October 2017), entry for Pauline Perlman, 11 July 1924-October 1995; SSN 129-14-0409. 
A search in their marriage license database, led to Harry's first name and their approximate marriage date. "New York City, Marriage License Indexes, 1907-1995," index, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 15 October 2017), entry for Harry Krug and Pauline Perlman, 19 June 1946, license no. 21389, Manhattan; citing Municipal Archives, New York City.
11. "New York City, Marriage License Indexes, 1907-1995," index, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 15 October 2017), entry for Bernard Perlman and Trude Schwatrz, 1953, license no. 4686, Queens; citing Municipal Archives, New York City. "U.S., Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014," index, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 15 October 2017), entry for Bernard B. Perlman, 23 May 1927-9 September 1997, SSN 132-16-8364, Lake Worth, pal Beach County, Florida.

10 October 2017

Tombstone Tuesday: Sylvia Kraslow, Montefiore Cemetery, Queens, NY

Hang with me here, this may get a little confusing!

A couple of weeks ago I posted about Joe and Rose Kraslow. They had a daughter named Sylvia. Today's post is not about her. As far as I can decipher, Sylvia Kraslow, the daughter of Joe and Rose, was born in the Spring of 1919. At the time of her sister Ethel's death in February 2009, Sylvia was likely married to Samuel Tankel. She had, perhaps, been married previously to someone named Kaufman.

The Sylvia Kraslow identified in the gravestone, below, had a father whose Hebrew name was Abraham. She died 5 June 1970 at the age of 46. That would place her birth date around 1924.

Here lies
Tzviya daughter of Avraham Eliyahu
Died 1 Sivan 5730
May her soul be bound in the bonds of the living
SYLVIA
KRASLOW
BELOVED WIFE
DEVOTED MOTHER

I cannot yet acquire this Sylvia's death certificate in New York City since death records do not become public until after 50 years from demise. However, her Social Security record, indexed on Ancestry, indicates that she was born on 3 May 1924.[1]

According to the recently available "New York City, Marriage License Indexes, 1907-1995," available at Ancestry [thank you Reclaim the Records!], a Sylvia Hochman, married a Joseph Kraslow in the Bronx in 1954 (when Sylvia would have been about 20 years old).[2]

According the the 1940 and 1930 U.S. Census and the 1925 New York State Census, Abraham and Sarah Hochman's eldest daughter, Sylvia's, reported ages are consistent with birth in 1924.[3]

Sylvia Hochman's husband Joseph Kraslow is not the Joe Kraslow (Jossel Kraselewski) mentioned in the blog post of two weeks ago. While I cannot yet prove it, I believe Sylvia's husband was either the nephew or cousin of the elder Joseph. The elder one was born in Labun in about 1892. The younger one was born in the United States (either Boston or New York in 1922).

Froim Krasilowski (later known as Frank Kraslow) came to the United States with his wife Golda's Sirota family in 1921.[4] The Sirota's were reportedly born and raised in Gritsev, a town 8 miles southwest of Labun, Ukraine. Froim, traveling with the Sirotas, was also reported on the manifest as residing in and born in Gritsev. However, his naturalization record casts doubt on his reported birth location.

Froim/Frank applied for citizenship twice: first as Froim Kraslow and second as Frank Kraslow. His first petition was denied due to "lack of prosecution" [he likely did not follow through to complete the process.] His first declaration of intention and petition for naturalization indicated he was born in Labun on 15 June 1896.[5] Froim also reported two sons born in the United States: Joseph (born in 1922) and David (b. 1926). His second petition was filed in 1938 and he took his oath of citizenship on 20 February 1939.[6] Rose Kraslow (the elder Joe's wife) was one of the witnesses for Frank's second petition.

While Frank and Goldie Kraslow had been active members of the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association, neither of them are buried in any of the three of the landsmanshaft's plots in the New York metropolitan area.[7] I have yet to determine where their graves are located.

I recorded graves in the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association plots in Montefiore Cemetery in 2008 and 2012. The only Joseph Kraslow I recorded then was the one born in about 1892. Montefiore Cemetery's current burial list includes an additional Joseph Kraslow who died on 29 April 2016. I believe this was Sylvia's husband Joe (son of Frank). The cemetery's index indicates that the Joe who died in 2016 was 93 years old. That would be consistent with birth in 1922 or 1923 (the same year as Frank's eldest son). He is buried in the grave location next to Sylvia.

I have located obituaries for neither Sylvia nor Joseph Kraslow who died in 2016.[8] I believe there are currently two avenues  to pursue. 

The first is to acquire Frank Kraslow's SS-5 (Social Security card application). I recently ordered the record. Since he was born more than 120 years ago, I will be able to see his parent's names. From that I may be able to determine whether he and the elder Joe, who were both from Labun, also had the same parents. 

I have to admit that I am leaning toward the thought the Joes are cousins rather than uncle and nephew. This is principally because in Ashkenazi tradition, it would be unusual for a nephew to have the same name as a close living relative. Although, I suppose this could occur if the younger Joe was named after a close relative in his mother's family (I may have to look further at the Sirotas. I already know that Golda Sirota Kraslow's father was Pesach/Phillip Sirota, not Joseph).

The second tack would be to acquire a photo of the gravestone for the Joe who died in 2016 - assuming the family has already installed one. If his family accurately inscribed his full Hebrew name (with patronymic), we will know if Froim was, as suspected, Joseph's father.

Sylvia and Joseph Kraslow's graves are located in Montefiore Cemetery, Queens, NY at gate 567W, block 5, row 10R, graves 1 and 2.

Notes:
1. There is, unfortunately no point in ordering her Social Security card application (SS-5) because the Social Security Administration promises to black out parents' names for anyone whose birthday was less than 120 years ago. "U.S., Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007," index, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 1 October 2017), entry for Sylvia Kraslow, June 1970, SSN 125-16-1785. 
2. I am similarly unable to get a copy of this marriage record because it has not yet become a public record. "New York City, Marriage License Indexes, 1907-1995," index, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 8 October 2017), entry for Sylvia Hochman and Joseph Kraslow, 1954, Bronx County, New York; citing New York City Clerk's Office.
3. 1940 U.S. Census, Kings County, NY, population schedule, Brooklyn, enumeration district 24-2179, sheet 1B, household 15, Abraham and Sarah Hochman family; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 8 October 2017); citing NARA microfilm publication T627, roll 2603.
   1930 U.S. Census, Kings Co., NY, pop. sched., Brooklyn, e.d. 24-797, sheet 1A, dwelling 1, family 10, Abraham and Sarah Hochman family; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 8 October 2017); citing NARA microfilm publication T626, roll 1532.
   1925 New York State Census, Kings Co., NY, enumeration of inhabitants, Brooklyn, assembly district 2, election district 48, sheet 56, Abraham and Sarah Hochman family; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 8 October 2017); citing ew York State Archives, Albany. 
4. Manifest, S.S. Finland, 13 June 1921, list 24, line 21, Froim Krasilowski, age 27; images, "New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 17 December 2010).
5. Froim Kraslow, naturalization file no. 154950 (denied - 1932), Southern District Court of New York; National Archives - Northeast Region, New York, Record Group 21.
6. Frank Kraslow, naturalization file no. 314507 (1939), Southern District Court of New York; National Archives - Northeast Region, New York, Record Group 21.
7. Frank and the elder Joe Kraslow are listed among the group's leadership in a photograph from about 1950 taken to commemorate the landsmanshaft's 40th anniversary.
8. It is of interest to note that, in contrast with Frank Kraslow's elder son Joseph, younger son, David, was quite celebrated when he died on 9 January 2017. David Jerome Kraslow was a respected editor and correspondent for many years in Washington, D.C., California and, especially, in Florida. He also wrote two books on the Viet Nam War. "David Jerome Kraslow, 1926-2017," Miami Herald (Miami, FL), 10 January 2017; transcription, Genealogy Bank (http://www.genealogybank.com : accessed 9 October 2017). The information in this obituary presents a third option for continued research: contact David's offspring (who are mentioned in the obit) and ask them about their family history.

03 October 2017

Tombstone Tuesday: Samuel and Toby Rosenthal, Montefiore Cemetery, Queens, New York

All one has to do is spend a short time researching in genealogy and it becomes clear that there are many researchers who are generous with their skills. I have transcribed many Hebrew tombstones and, as a result, I am getting better and better. I can, in most cases, transcribe names and dates and short standard epitaphs. But, when relatives waxed poetic, I need help.[1]

For today's post, I sought out translators at Tracing the Tribe FaceBook page and, as usual, I was not disappointed. 

For Toba's gravestone, I was helped by: Lara Diamond, Israel Pickholtz, Esther Chanie Dushinsky. Thank you, all!

For Samuel's,  I am indebted to Osher Birzon and David Lachmi. Thank you!

And, as noted by commenter Naomi Maslin Godel, both of these stones reflect beautifully crafted sentiments.


Here lies 
A pity for those who are gone and no longer to be found [a]
The crown of our heads has fallen
There is no comfort for us on the death of our spouse and our dear and modest mother who feared heaven and feared sin. Who was filled with mitzvahs as a pomegranate.[b] Her house was open wide and poor people were part of the family[c]
 

Toba Mindel
daughter of Chaim Shmuel
Rosenthal
 
Died 20 Tishri 5700
[2 October 1939]
 
May her soul be bound in the bonds of the living  
----------
[a] quote from the Gemara, a rabbinical commentary on the Mishnah, forming the second part of the Talmud.
[b] there are 613 mitzvahs [commandments, good deeds] and many, many seeds in the pomegranate
[c] literally, "sons of the house"

----------
Taube (or Toba) Rosenthal was born in 1883 in Shepetovka, Russian Empire (today, in Ukraine) to Chaim and Chana Lieberman.[2] Shepetivka (the current name of the town in Ukraine) is about 28 kilometers NW of the community of Labun/Lubin.

On 16 June 1903, Taube married Yehoshua (aka Schia) Rosenthal, a Zaslav native born on 26 September 1882 to Michal Rosenthal and Rivka Seidman.[3]

Here lies
Our eyes will shed tears on the tragedy
Our dear father Mr. Yehoshua Zelig son of Yechiel Michel is gone
He lies buried in the grave
Woe to us, for the crown of our head has fallen
That's why our souls cry in secret
Because he was innocent and honest, he walked on straight paths
He studied Torah and mitzvot all the days
Acquired knowledge of Torah through learning[a], bought himself eternal life
May he rest in peace
Died on the 17th of Adar II 5708

 [March 28, 1948]
May his soul be bound in the bond of life
Rosenthal
----------
[a] literally, "bought himself Torah" 
----------

The couple had their first child, their daughter Udel (later called Anna), in Russia on 26 February 1906. 

Schie Rosenthal left Zaslav and on 11 May 1907, boarded the S.S. Astoria and sailed from Glasgow, Scotland to New York. He identified himself as a glazier by profession. He indicated he would be heading to his uncle S. Rosenthal at 110 Brighton Street, Boston, Massachusetts.[4]

Taube and Udel departed from Hamburg, Germany on the S.S. President Grant more than three years later. They landed in New York on 15 September 1910.[5]

Max Rosenthal was born 2 July 1912; Helen, 9 July 1915; and Harry, 10 August 1919.[6]

The family was enumerated in the 1915 New York State census at 112 Broome Street in Lower Manhattan. Sam (Schie's new first name) Rosenthal was a button hole maker.[7] Taube had adopted Tillie as her new American name.

By the time Sam registered for the World War I draft on 12 September 1918 and into the 1920s, the family lived in Brooklyn at 377 South 1st Street.[8]

In June 1925, the Rosenthals lived in Brooklyn at 876 Driggs Avenue. Sam, was still a button hole maker. Eldest daughter Anna was 19 and worked as a bookkeeper for a glass business.[9]  

The 1930 April enumeration found the family at the same apartment but, now, Sam had changed occupations and was working as a glazier.[10]

Son Max was not with the family on the 1940 census. I have not located a marriage record for him, but his tombstone in a cemetery in Florida, indicates he, at some point, married a woman named Lillian.[11]

The Rosenthal's, minus Max and mother Tillie, who had passed away in 1939, lived at 104 Division Avenue, Brooklyn. Sam had his own glass business and youngest son, Harry, worked with him.[12]

Samuel became a citizen on 10 July 1941. Two of his children acted as witnesses: Helen Levy and Max Rosenthal.[13]

Helen likely married Samson Levy in September 1940.[14] She died in April 1981.[15]

As far as can be determined, Anna did not marry. She died 13 July 1962 and is interred in the same plot as her parents Montefiore Cemetery.

The Rosenthals' graves are located within the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association plot in Montefiore Cemetery at block 89, gate 156W, line 10L. Tillie is in grave 5 and Sam in grave 6.

Notes
1. I recommend three translation options for most Jewish genealogists: Tracing the Tribe FaceBook page, Genealogy Translations FaceBook page and JewishGen's ViewMate application.
2. Kings County, New York, death certificate no. 19761 (1939), Toby Rosenthal; Municipal Archives, New York City. 
3. Marriage date from Samuel Rosenthal, naturalization file no. 296993 (10 July 1941), U.S. District Court, Eastern District, Brooklyn, New York; NARA, NE Region, Record Group 21. Samuel's parents names as identified on his gravestone and his death certificate: New York County, New York, death certificate no. 7610 (1948), Samuel Rosenthal; Municipal Archives, New York City. Sam's birth date is documented in two records, his naturalization record (cited, above) and his World War I draft card: "United States, World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918," images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 22 November 2016), card for Sam Rosenthal, serial no. 61, Local Draft Board fro Division 53, Brooklyn, NY.
4. I have not yet located Sam in Massachusetts. Manifest, S.S. Astoria, 21 May 1907, stamped p. 15, line 30, Schie Rosenthal, age 26; images, "New York, Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 7 December 2016).
5. Manifest, S.S. President Grant, 15 September 1910, p. 7, line 13-145, Taube Rosenthal, age 26, and Udel Rosenthal, age 4.
6. Samuel Rosenthal, naturalization file no. 296993.
7. 1915 New York State Census, New York County, New York, enumeration of inhabitants, Manhattan, assembly district 4, election district 11, p. 7, Same and Tillie Rosenthal family; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 22 November 2016); citing New York State Archives, Albany.
8.
"United States, World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918," images, Ancestry, card for Sam Rosenthal, serial no. 61, Local Draft Board fro Division 53, Brooklyn, NY.
1920 U.S. Census, Kings Co., NY, population schedule, Brooklyn, enumeration district 846, sheet 26A, dwelling 59, family 573, Samuel and Tillie Rosenthal family; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 22 November 2016); citing NARA microfilm publication T625, roll 1166. 
9. 1925 New York State Census, Kings Co., NY, enumeration of inhabitants, Brooklyn, a.d. 4, e.d. 6, p. 5, Sam and Tillie Rosenthal family; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 22 November 2016); citing New York State Archives, Albany.
10. 1930 U.S. Census, Kings Co., NY, population schedule, Brooklyn, enumeration district 24-46, sheet7 A, dwelling 32, family 140, Samuel and Tillie Rosenthal family; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 5 January 2015); citing NARA microfilm publication T626, roll 1501. 
11. "Florida Death Index, 1877-1998," index, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 1 October 2017), entry for Max N. Rosenthal, 27 September 1983, Broward County, FL; citing Florida Department of Health. For name of wife, see Max N. Rosenthal, grave, 1983, Star of David Memorial Gardens, North Lauderdale, Broward Co., FL; index and images, Find A Grave Memorial #43805899 (http://www.findagrave.com : accessed 1 October 2017).
12. 1940 U.S. Census, Kings Co., NY, pop. sched., e.d. 24-568, sheet 9A, household 207, Samuel Rosenthal family; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 5 January 2015); citing NARA microfilm publication T627, roll 2561. 
13. Samuel Rosenthal, naturalization file no. 296993.
14. "New York City, Marriage License Indexes, 1907-1995," index, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 1 October 2017), entry for Helen Rosenthal and Samson Levy, 6 September 1940, Brooklyn license no. 20522; citing New York City Clerk's Office.
15. "U.S., Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014," index, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 7 December 2016), entry for Helen Levy, April 1981, Brooklyn, Kings Co., NY.

\