18 July 2017

Tombstone Tuesday: Samuel and Rose Cantor, Montefiore Cemetery, Queens, New York

Back in November 2016 I researched and documented Zalman and Rachel Rochman, immigrants from Labun whose graves are in one of the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association plots in Montefiore Cemetery. At the time, I was able to locate records for their two sons, Charles Rochman and Aaron Rockman. I was not, however, able to find any records for their two daughters, Ronia and Mindla, who had immigrated with their mother.[1]

Well, I've located Ronia. In the United States, she became Rose Rochman and married Sam Kanchich, who became Sam Cantor.


CANTOR

Ronia daughter of Zalman
ROSE
BELOVED WIFE
MOTHER
GRANDMOTHER
JAN. 5,1903
DEC. 25, 1981

Yisrael son of Moshe Zav
SAMUEL
BELOVED HUSBAND
FATHER
GRANDFATHER
SEPT. 30, 1899
JAN. 20, 1978

TOGETHER IN LIFE, TOGETHER IN DEATH

The key to determining Rose Cantor's maiden name was linking her death records in the "California, Death Index, 1940-1997," database on Ancestry and her gravestone. The database included her birth (although identified as 1904, not 1903) and death date and her father's surname.[2] And, of course, her gravestone indicated that her father's name was Zalman. Further research and census and naturalization records confirmed earlier evidence.

Nineteen year old Ronia Rojchmann arrived in New York Harbor on the S.S. Mount Carroll on 1 November 1921 with her mother, Ruchla (Rachel), and her siblings, Szika (Charles), Aron (Aaron), and Mindla. Ruchla, her husband Zalman, and all the children were born in Labun.

Srul Kancrik (Samuel Cantor) arrived in New York on 22 February 1921.[3] He'd been born in and resided in what appears to have been Sudilkov [typed as "Serdylkow" on his manifest]. Sudilkov is 24 kilometers northeast of Labun. So, it is possible that he and Ronia knew each other before emigration.

The couple married on 31 May 1925 in Brooklyn.[4] By June of that year they lived in an apartment at 417 Hinsdale in Brooklyn.[5] Sam was a shoemaker.

Their first child Saul Cantor was born 20 February 1926 (he died 4 February 2004).[6] In 1930, the family lived at 158 Boerum Street, Brooklyn. Sam was an operator at a ladies shoe factory.[7] Their daughter Mildred Cantor was born in 1930.[8]

In 1940, the Cantors were at 442 Logan Street in Brooklyn and Sam had his own business running a grocery store.[9] Grandfather, Solomon (Zalman) Rochman lived with them. I had not located Rochman previously in the 1940 census. Seeking the Cantors allowed me to find him.

Sam Cantor's Social Security Death Index record indicates his last residence was in Brooklyn in 1978.[10] Rose, however, died almost three years later in Orange County, California.

Rose's and Samuel's graves are located in the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association plot in block 89, gate 156N, line 1L, grave 3 and 4, Montefiore Cemetery.

Notes:
1. Manifest, S.S. Mount Carroll, 1 November 1921, p. 18, lines 1-5, Ruchla (age 46 [?]), Szika (11), Aron (9), Ronia (19), and Mindla (17) Rojchmann; images, "New York, Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 24 April 2011).
2. "California, Death Index, 1940-1997," database, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 24 September 1916), entry for Rose Cantor, 25 December 1981; citing California Department of Health Services, Sacramento. 
3. Manifest, S.S. Aquitania, 22 February 1921, list 15, line 6, Srul Kancrik, age 20; images, "New York, Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 16 July 2017). 
4. Kings County, New York, marriage certificate no. 8252 (1925), Saul Kanchich and Rose Rackman; Municipal Archives, New York City; index, "NYC Brides Record Index," Italian Genealogy Group (http://www.italiangen.org : accessed 16 July 2017), search on sounds like "Rose Rockman." [original record will be ordered]
   Sam Cantor Petition for Naturalization (1933), naturalization file 188237, Eastern District of New York; images, "New York, State and Federal Naturalization Records, 1794-1940," Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 16 July 2017). 
5. 1925 New York State census, Kings County, New York, enumeration of inhabitants, Brooklyn, assembly district 2, election district 47, p. 46, Sam and Rose Cantor; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 16 July 2017); citing New York State Archives, Albany. 
6. Sam Cantor Petition for Naturalization (1933), naturalization file 188237, Eastern District of New York.
7. 1930 U.S. Census, Kings Co., NY, pop. sched., Brooklyn, E.D. 24-170, p. 2A, dwelling 72, family 237, Samuel and Rose Cantor family; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 20 December 2010); citing NARA microfilm publication T626, roll 1517.
8. Sam Cantor Petition for Naturalization (1933), naturalization file 188237, Eastern District of New York.
9. 1940 U.S. Census, Kings Co., NY, pop. sched., Brooklyn, E.D. 24-2664, p. 13A, household 251, Samuel and Rose Cantor family [indexed as Carter]; ; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 16 July 2017); citing NARA microfilm publication T627, roll 2617.
10. "U.S., Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014," index, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 24 September 2016); entry for Samuel Cantor, SSN 124-24-4001, January 1978.
11. "California, Death Index, 1940-1997," database, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 24 September 1916), entry for Rose Cantor, 25 December 1981.  

11 July 2017

Tombstone Tuesday: Philip and Minnie Goldberg, Beth David Cemetery, Pinelawn, New York

A couple of weeks ago, I profiled Philip Goldberg's parents, Bernard and Lottie Goldberg, who are interred in one of the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association plots at Montefiore Cemetery, Queens, NY. 

Philip, born in Lubin/Labun, Russian Empire (today, Yurovshchina, Ukraine) arrived in Boston on the S.S. Manchuria with his mother, Zlate, and sisters Chaika, Minna and Sonja on 21 February 1921.[1] Philip's and his wife Minnie's graves are in the association plot at Beth Moses Cemetery in Pinelawn, NY.

FATHER
Pesach son of Avraham

PHILIP
GOLDBERG

DEVOTED AND GIVING
"HIS SPIRIT OF GOOD LIVES"

FEB. 4, 1904
JUNE 24, 1994
 -------------------------
MOTHER

Minna daughter of Binyamin
MINNIE "KOPELOV"
GOLDBERG
SHE WAS BEAUTIFUL AND
BRIGHT, YET SO SAD
BE AT PEACE, AT LAST
SEPT. 15, 1906 - NOV. 7, 1995

In June 1925, Philip, an unmarried glazier, lived with his mother, Lottie; brother, Herman; and sister Sylvia at 95 Ridge Street in Manhattan.[2] Philip and his family had been in the United States four years. Philip was not yet a citizen.

In April 1930, Philip and his same family members resided at 2067 Harrison Avenue in the Bronx.[3] In addition, Philip's elder sister, Ida, her husband Herman Dolgin and their daughter, Bernice, lived in the same apartment. Philip, a glazier working at a glass store, was still an alien.  

Minnie Kopelov naturalized on 3 September 1931.[4] She was single, working as a milliner and had immigrated on the S.S. Berengaria, landing in New York with her sister Roza on 2 November 1923.[5] She had been born in Warsaw.

According to Philip's naturalization papers, filed on 8 July 1937, he and Minnie married in Monticello, Sullivan County, New York on 7 July 1936.[6]

By the April 1940 U.S. census, Philip and Minnie had a 2 year old daughter, Rena.[7] They lived in an apartment at 69 Pinehurst Avenue, New York, New York. Philip owned a wholesale glass business.

According to their Social Security Death Index records, the couple's last residence was in Long Beach, Long Island, New York.[8] 

Both Philip and Minnie Goldberg's graves are located in Block 24, Maccabee Road within the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association plot in Beth Moses Cemetery, Pinelawn, New York.

Notes:
1. Manifest, S.S. Manchuria, 21 February 1921, stamped p. 286, lines 23-27, Zlata Goldberg (age 43), Chaiko (20), Pinko (17), Minna (13), and Sonja (10); images, "Massachusetts, Passenger and Crew Lists, 1820-1963," Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 26 June 2017).
2. 1925 New York State Census, New York County, New York, enumeration of inhabitants, Manhattan, assembly district 4, election district 5, p. 48, Philip Goldberg; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 13 February 2017); citing New York State Archives, Albany. 
3. 1930 U.S. Census, Bronx Co., NY, population schedule, Bronx, enumeration district 3-605, sheet 5A, dwelling 2, family 99, Phillip Goldberg; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 13 February 2017); NARA microfilm publication T626, roll 1486. 
4. Minnie Kopelov naturalization file no. 181609, 3 September 1931, Southern District of New York; images, "New York, Naturalization records, 1882-1944," Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 25 June 2017); citing National Archives - Northeast Region, microfilm publication M1972m roll 753.
5. Manifest, S.S. Berengaria, 2 November 1923, stamped p. C. 19, line 13, Minia Kopelow, 17; images, "New York, Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 9 July 2017).
6. Philip Goldberg naturalization file no. 290421, 8 July 1937, Southern District of New York; images, "New York, Naturalization records, 1882-1944," Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 9 July 2017); citing National Archives - Northeast Region, Record Group 21.
7. 1940 U.S. Census, New York Co., NY, pop. sched., Manhattan, e.d. 31-2079, sheet 11A, household 205, Philip and Minnie Goldberg family; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 25 June 2017); NARA microfilm publication T627, roll 2675.
8. Social Security Administration, "U.S., Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014," index, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 25 June 2017), entry for Philip Goldberg, SS no. 064-03-0167 and entry for Minnie Goldberg, SS no. 076-38-0433.

27 June 2017

Tombstone Tuesday: Bernard and Lottie Goldberg, Montefiore Cemetery, Queens, New York

While I have yet to locate passenger records for Bernard Goldberg, it is clear that his wife, Lottie and her children were from the Russian Empire community of Labun (Lubin in Yiddish). They were members of the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association and were interred in the association's burial plot.

Here lies
A good and honest man Mr.
Avraham Dov son of Yekhiel Mikhel
Died 
16 Iyar 5685
May his soul be bound in the bonds of the living
Beloved Husband
And Dear Father
Bernard Goldberg
Died May 10, 1925
Age 60 Years

FATHER

While his gravestone indicates he was called Bernard, other records indicate that he adopted the name Bennie or Benjamin in the USA.[1] On their passenger manifest, his wife and children said they were going to Berko Goldberg in Brooklyn.[2] The name Berko is consistent with the Yiddish equivalent of his second Hebrew name, Dov.

Bennie's death certificate, lists his father as Michael Goldberg. His mother was Esther Cohen. The certificate also indicates that Bennie had been in the U.S.A for 14 years (estimated arrival in 1911) and had been working as a carpenter.

MOTHER

Here lies
Mrs. Zlate
daughter of Chaim
Died Erev Rosh Chodesh [29th] Iyar 5695 
May her soul be bound in the bonds of the living

OUR BELOVED
MOTHER

LOTTIE
GOLDBERG

DIED APRIL 30, 1938
AGED 60 YEARS

IN OUR HEARTS
SHE LIVES FOREVER

When Zlata and the children (Chaiko, Pinko, Minna, and Sonja) arrived in Boston in February 1921, they reported that they had been living in Lubin, Poland before immigration and had all been born in "Woylin," likely a reference to Volhynia Gubernia (the province in the Russian Empire).

According to her death certificate, Lottie's parents were Herman (anglicized from Chaim) Baratz and Sarah Greenberg.

While no earlier census record has been located for Bennie, it is possible that he had another son, Max, who came to the United States before the rest of the family. Lottie's death certificate was informed by a son, Max Goldberg, who lived at 2067 Harrison Street, Bronx, NY - Lottie's address in the 1930 census and at death in 1938.[3] I have located a World War I Draft Registration card for a Max Goldberg, who was born in 15 October 1894 in "Luben, Verlinski," Russia.[4] 

In June 1925, shortly after Bennie's death, Lottie lived with several of her children at 95 Ridge Street, New York, NY.[5]

Bennie and Lottie's children appear to have been:
  • Max Goldberg, b. 15 October 1894 (old enough to possibly have been Bennie's son from a first marriage);
  • Ida (Chaiko) Goldberg Dolgin, wife of Herman, b. 8 February 1901, d. September 1984;[6]
  • Philip Goldberg, husband of Minnie Kopelov, b. 2 February 1902 or 1904, d. 24 June 1994;
  • Minnie Goldberg, b. ca. 1907;
  • Herman Goldberg, b. ca 1908;
  • Sylvia (Sonja), b. ca. 1910.
Lottie was an active member of the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association's Sisters.

Bernard/Bennie's grave is located in the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association plot in block 89, gate 156N, Line 4R, grave 1, in Montefiore Cemetery, Queens, New York. Lottie's grave is in the same plot, line 5L, grave 2.

Notes:
1. New York County, New York, death certificate no. 12862, Bennie Goldberg, 10 May 1925; Municipal Archives, New York City.
    "U.S., Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007," index, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 26 June 2017); entry for Philip Goldberg, SSN 064-03-0167.
2. Manifest, S.S. Manchuria, 21 February 1921, stamped p. 286, lines 23-27, Zlata Goldberg (age 43), Chaiko (20), Pinko (17), Minna (13), and Sonja (10); images, "Massachusetts, Passenger and Crew Lists, 1820-1963," Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 26 June 2017).
3. New York, New York, death certificate no. 9642, Lottie Goldberg, 30 April 1938; Municipal Archives, New York City. 
    1930 U.S. Census, Bronx County, New York, population schedule, Bronx, enumeration district 3-605, sheet 5A, dwelling 2, family 99, Lottie Goldberg; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 13 February 2017); citing NARA microfilm publication T626, roll 1486.
4. "U.S., World War I Draft Cards, 1917-1918," images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 17 February 2015), card for Max Goldberg, serial no. 281, Draft Board 152, New York, New York; citing NARA microfilm publication M1509.
5. 1925 New York State Census, New York County, New York, enumeration of inhabitants, Manhattan, assembly district 4, election district 15, Lotty Goldberg family; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 13 February 2017); New York State Archives, Albany.
6. Ida Dolgin, naturalization file 474279, 14 February 1944, Southern District Court of New York; National Archives - NE Region, Record Group 21.
    "U.S., Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014," index, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 13 February 2017), entry for Ida Dolgin, September 1984, SSN 055-16-9342.

24 June 2017

LIVE! in Orlando, Florida!: IAJGS, July 23-28, 2017

At last summer's International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies Conference I was honored to be selected to present one of the LIVE! presentations: "Beyond the Manifest: Methods for Confirming One's Ancestral Origins." 

A few weeks ago I was trying to out-guess the program planners for this year's IAJGS 2017 in Orlando, Florida and determined that, based upon preliminary room assignments for my six (!) talks, I was not going to carried LIVE! Well, I just checked the 2017 conference schedule this morning and discovered that LIVE! sessions are now listed and they include two of my sessions. Yes!

More than 50 IAJGS LIVE! presentations (and handouts) will be available online as they are being presented. These videos will continue to be available on-demand via Internet connection through 1 November 2017. The entire LIVE! conference schedule will be available to those who pay $149. A single day of LIVE! is $89.

Information about LIVE! seems a bit hidden on the IAJGS conference website. If one starts at the conference homepage, enter live into the search box on the upper right. To actually see the list of LIVE! sessions right now, one must check the program schedule.

It seems that one must go into the conference registration area on the IAJGS conference webpage to register and pay for for access to presentations included in LIVE! 

My two LIVE! sessions will be:
  • "Learning Our Craft: Online Opportunities for Improving Our research Skills," Wednesday, July 26, 11:15 AM - 12:30 PM; and
  • "Blogging Family History: Reading, Writing, and Sharing," Thursday, July 27, 8:15 - 9:30 AM

In addition, I will be presenting:
  • "Beyond the Manifest: Methods for Confirming One's Ancestral Origins," Tuesday, July 25, 11:15 AM - 12:30 PM;
  • "When it Takes a Village: Applying Cluster Research Techniques," Wednesday, July 26, 2:00-3:15 PM;
  • "Memory and Mystery: Breaking Down Family Lore," Wednesday, JUly 26, 3:30 - 4:45 PM; and
  • "Where's the Beef? Well-Done Research and Evidence Analysis," Wednesday, July 26, 5:00 - 6:15 PM.
In addition to the videos included in LIVE!, there is an opportunity to purchase MP3s (audio) of most of the conference presentations. I always enjoy this package. I load them onto my iPod and listen to them as I exercise during the months between conferences.

I look forward to seeing you in Orlando! If not, see ya at the movies (er...on screen). 😁

20 June 2017

Tombstone Tuesday: David and Mollie Kaby, Montefiore Cemetery, Queens, New York

Last week I posted about Paul Lederman whose grave is within one of the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association plots in Montefiore Cemetery. I determined, during research for that post, that Paul had, likely in the early 1940s, married Yvette Kaby, daughter of David and Mollie Kaby, who are also buried in the same Montefiore cemetery plot. 

Here lies
David son of Amran
May his soul be bound in the bonds of the living

DAVID
KABY

BELOVED FATHER
DEAR GRANDFATHER
GREAT GRANDFATHER

DIED SEPT. 2, 1972
85 YEARS YOUNG
ETERNAL LIFE

David arrived in the the port of New York on 20 May 1907.[1] He traveled from Naples on the S.S. Liguria and said he had been born in Jaffa, Palestine.

On 22 October 1909, David married fellow immigrant Mollie Levine.[2]

Here lies
Malkah daughter of Velvel ha-Levi
May her soul be bound in the bonds of the living

MOLLIE
KABY
BELOVED WIFE
DEVOTED MOTHER
AND GRANDMOTHER

DIED FEB. 19, 1966
AGE 73 YEARS
REST IN PEACE

While Levine was shown was Mollie's surname on her marriage record, it appears that it was the family surname adopted in the United States. The original family surname was Chajchuk

In Ancestry's "U.S. Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007" database, which reflects information provided in Social Security program applications (Form SS-5) and subsequent claims, Mollie's father's name is listed as Velvel Hychuk.[3] Her mother was Rifka Tartfofsky (a transcription that may be in error). On her indexed marriage record, her mother's last name was listed as Dostirosky
[I have not yet ordered copies of her SS-5 or marriage record. It will be interesting to see compare what is actually written on them.].

The "Social Security Applications and Claim Index" database lists Mollie's birth date as 16 January 1889. David Kaby's naturalization petition provides Mollie's birth date as 25 April 1891.[4] The 1920 U.S. census, taken in January 1920, indicates she was 28 years old (born between 1891 and 1892).[5] The 1940 U.S. census is consistent with 1920: Mollie was 47 (born about 1892).[6]

No manifest of arrival or naturalization papers have been located, thus far, for Mollie, so we cannot say, for sure when she immigrated to the United States or where she had lived before emigration. The 1920 U.S. Census indicates she arrived in the USA in 1907.  

However, Mollie's widowed mother Rywka, sister Jenta (later Helen) and brother, Moszko (Morris), arrived Philadelphia in 1921.[7] They reported that they were from Salnice, Russia. This likely Sal'nitsa, Ukraine (before World War I, in the Litin District of Podolia Gubernia), about 195 km WSW of Kiev (about 55 km SE of Lubin).

Mollie likely had another sister, Gussie Levine, who in 1925 lived at 354 South 2nd Street, Brooklyn, with her mother, Ray, brother Morris and sister Helen.[8]

David's naturalization petition in 1924 reported birth dates and birth locations for each of his and Mollie's children. The family moved around quite a bit. 
  • Sarah, born 7 October 1910 in Connecticut
  • Vera, 24 Nov 1911 in Rochester, NY
  • Bertha 23 Nov 1915 in NY, NY
  • Rose 19 Aug 1917 in Kings Co, NY
They had Yvette in New York in about 1925.[6]

In April 1940, David was not enumerated in the census with Mollie and Yvette. They were at 35 Brighton First Walk in Brooklyn. A 1942 Los Angeles City directory and the 1942 World War II Draft Registration card for David located him in Los Angeles. In his draft card, he notes that while his address is 329 1/4 North Mott Street, Los Angeles, CA, Mollie is at 3014 Bridge 8th Street in Brooklyn.[9]

For the most part, David was a tailor. When he was in Rochester, NY, the city directory identified him as a "moulder."

David Kaby's grave is located in Montefiore Cemetery in the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association plot, block 5, gate 567W, line 3L, grave 1. Mollie is in grave 2.

I have been in contact with a family member to try to discern why the Kabys were associated with the Lubin landsmanshaft.  I learned a few things that were not immediately apparent in the records I located online:
  • David had a sister also in the USA [I believe, based upon some records I have sine located, that her married name was Bessie Makowsky/Makoff and she was married to Meyer. They lived in several locations around the country, including DeKalb, IL; New Haven, CT; and Bakersfield, CA.]
  • Yvette Kaby and Paul Lederman were divorced at some point. Paul's second marriage was to a non-Jewish woman. When Paul died, Yvette convinced her to have Paul buried in a Jewish cemetery. Yvette arranged for his burial in the plot near her parents. [I still don't know why her parents are in this plot, however.]
Notes:
1. Manifest, S.S. Liguria, 20 May 1907, stamped p. 21, line 4, David Kaby, age 20; images, "New York, Passenger Manifests, 1820-1957," Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 10 April 2017).
2. New York County, New York, marriage certificate no. 21308, David Koby and Mollie Levine, 22 October 1909; index, "New York, New York City Marriage records, 1829-1940," Family Search (https://www.familysearch.org : accessed 10 April 2017); citing Municipal Archives, New York City. [copy of original record will be ordered.] 
3. "U.S. Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007," index, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 10 April 2017); entry for Mollie Kaby, Social Security Administration, Baltimore, MD. >
4. David Kaby naturalization file no. 86364, Kings County (New York) Supreme Court, vol. 347, p. 14; images, "New York, County Naturalization Records, 1791-1980," FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org : accessed 10 April 2017), Kings>image 48 of 766.
5. 1920 U.S. Census, Kings County, New York, population schedule, Brooklyn, enumeration district 816, sheet 10B, dwelling 16, family 199, David and Mollie Kaby family; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 10 April 2017); citing NARA microfilm publication T625, roll 1165.  6. 1940 U.S. Census, Kings County, New York, population schedule, Brooklyn, enumeration district 24-425, sheet 3A, household 80, Mollie Kaby; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 10 April 2017); citing NARA microfilm publication T627, roll 2557.   

7. Manifest, S.S. Samland, 2 July 1921, p. 36, lines 19-21, Rywka Chajczuk (age 50), Moszko Chajczuk (24), and Jenta Chajczuk (18); images, "Pennsylvania Passenger and Crew Lists, 1800-1962," Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 4 May 2017). This is known to be Mollie's family due to the shared surname (Chajczuk), as well as correlated records for her sister, Helen Milstein's, naturalization and marriage. In addition, destination of the Chajczuk family in the manifest correlates with an address close to that of the Kaby's in the 1920 census: 265 or 269 South 2nd Street, Brooklyn.  
8. 1925 New York State Census, Kings County, New York, enumeration of inhabitants, Brooklyn, assembly district 14, election district 23, p. 40, Gussie Levine; images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 18 June 2017); New York State Archives, Albany. 9. U.S., World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942," images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 10 April 2017); entry for David Kaby, serial no. U3493, Los Angeles, California.